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The 3 Biggest Mistakes Made By Candy Companies

By candy companies we mean the big businesses that brought us so much sweet and joy. We all love a bit of sugar every now and then. And although you may regret is after eating it, you enjoy every bit of it. However, sometimes companies want to make a big change to their sweet product, so they either stop making them or change their entire flavor, or something else. Those changes sometimes make us sad… or sour. 

Here are a few candy products that didn’t sit well with consumers. 

 

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Cadbury Eggs crack up

The most prized sweetness in an Ester basket- the egg. And Cadbury decided to bring joy of it all year round, which created a little controversy at first. Also, when you mess with a candy that also happens to be associated with a holiday, people tend to be extra-sensitive. Then there were changes to the recipe that nearly caused the fans and company in UK to break down. Then there’s the whole fact that you can’t get the British version in America because Hershey’s has the right to produce them and makes them differently. 

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 Tan M&M’s are taken away from the bag

M&Ms were first created in 1941 during World War II, following a search for non-melting chocolate that soldiers could carry in their kit bags as a sqeet and quick source of energy. Soon, the little bags were featuring brown, yellow, green, red, and purple colors. In 1954, Peanut M&Ms were introduced. Initially made only in the tan color. The synonym for tan is beige and they don’t seem to be found anywhere in the beloved M&M’s bags. From what Hungry in Dublin understands, is Tan M&Ms officially made their exit in 1995, when Mars, Inc. allegedly decided that there was no need to have two shades of brown M&Ms. The company decided to replace the tan with blue. However, until this day we hear how this change is made for worse as the tan seemed to taste better, according to many people. 

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 Toblerone changes its shape

The costs of the rising ingredient caused parent company Melendez to alter the iconic Toblerone shape a couple of years back, putting more space between the triangles to allow for the same packaging size with less actual chocolate. According to the New York Times, this drastic move cuts the standard-sized bar’s weight down from 170g to 150g (about a 12% loss). This horrible change did not make the fans happy. I mean, you’re cutting off chocolate! 

Sometimes changes are good. But sometimes, we just like to stick to the original and authentic products. At least they don’t give us a sour feeling. 

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